Cold Server Back Up Recovery


This is quick reference guide to ‘Cold’ Server Backup rights that come with SQL Server 2008 R2. As always, refer directly to the Product Use Rights and the Product List. This does confer any rights and is for information purposes only.

These benefits require Software Assurance coverage, […]

1.         “Cold” Disaster Recovery Rights.

For each instance of eligible server software you run in a physical or virtual OSE on a licensed server, you may temporarily run a backup instance in a physical or virtual OSE on a server dedicated to disaster recovery.  The product use rights for the software and the following limitations apply to your use of software on a disaster recovery server.

· The server must be turned off except for (i) limited software self-testing and patch management, or (ii) disaster recovery.

· The server may not be in the same cluster as the production server.

· You may run the backup and production instances at the same time only while recovering the production instance from a disaster.

· Your right to run the backup instances ends when your Software Assurance coverage ends.

[Ref: Product Use Rights, December 2010, Page 120 of 138]

 

 

Determining your SQL Licensing Requirements


SQL Server Datacenter

Licensed on a Per Processor model:

1. Count and license all the physical Procs in a box

2. Obtain unlimited # of running instance of SQL Datacenter in an unlimited # of OS environments.

3. SQL has Server Mobility Rights. Check the Microsoft White Paper

4. Down Edition Rights 

SQL Server Enterprise

A) Licensing All Physical Processors
If you license all of the physical processors on the server (one license per physical processor), you may run unlimited
instances of the SQL Server software in 4 OSEs (either physical or virtual):

1. Count all the Physical Procs in the box

2. You may run unlimited # instances in up to four operating systems environments for each Enterprise license you assign to the server.

3. Down Edition Rights apply to those Instances.

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Alternative to a Physical Processor count – look at the Procs Used:

B) Licensing a Portion of the Physical Processors
If you choose not to license all of the physical processors, you will need to know the number of virtual processors
supporting each virtual OSE and the number of cores per physical processor/socket. Typically,
each virtual processor is the equivalent of one core:

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1. / (Divide) # of cores (hyper-threading
off)

2. / (Divide) # threads (if hyper-threading on) per
physical processor

SQL Server Standard Edition

1. If you license on the physical processors you may run the software in the physical OSE only.

2. If you license all of the physical processors on the server (one license per physical processor), you may run unlimited
instances of the SQL Server software in 1 Physical OSE.

3. In order to run the software in Virtual OSEs, you will need to license the number of virtual processors supporting each virtual OSE (See above)

4. The total number of physical and virtual processors used by those operating system environments cannot exceed the number of software licenses assigned to that server (1:1)

Failover Rights

For any operating system environment in which you run instances of the server software, you may run up to the same number of passive fail-over instances in a separate operating system environment for temporary support. The number of physical and virtual processors used in that separate operating system environment must not exceed the number of physical and virtual processors used in the corresponding operating system environment in which the active instances are running. You may run the passive fail-over instances on a server other than the licensed server.

Product Use Rights, July 2010, Page 62 of 136

Down Edition Rights

1. New “down edition” rights are being introduced for SQL Server 2008 R2

2. Customers who purchased a higher edition of SQL Server have rights to use a lower edition, but the Product Use rights of the higher edition will prevail. Product Use Rights, July 2010

Multiplexing

1. A SQL Server CAL and Windows Server CAL are required for each device or user that is connected to the
multiplexing or pooling software or hardware front end.

2. The number of tiers of hardware or software between the SQL Server and the user or devices that ultimately use its data, services, or functionality does not affect the number of CALs required

3. Check the Microsoft Licensing Brief

Server Mobility

1. You may move running instances of SQL Server 2008 R2 Enterprise or Datacenter as needed across servers within a server farm. (There is no 90 day minimum period before reassignment.)

2. Check the Microsoft White Paper


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