How does the True Up Process work?

The Microsoft Enterprise Agreement has a True Up process, wherein the end-customer is responsible for an Annual Inventory of Software deployment. The Enterprise Agreement (EA) contract requires an annual report of the number of qualified devices, or in some circumstances, qualified users to determine the quantity of devices that should be increased at the anniversary.

In the diagram below, the customer has a 3 Year Enterprise Agreement, wherein, the customer is paying for License and Software Assurance (L&SA) over the Agreement term. For information purposes, this is recognised as one third of the License each year and one year of Software Assurance (SA).

During the Agreement term, the customer has added a number of additional qualified devices to the network. In the first year of the Enterprise Agreement (EA), 30 organisation iPads accessing the corporate VDI have been discovered via the SAM database. This would be added to the True Up payment for the 1st Anniversary (Start of 2nd year) etc.

For additional support also refer to the EA contracts What are the EA contract documents? and the Qualified Device definition: What is the definition of a Qualified Device?

The Enterprise Agreement True Up Requirements


Microsoft updated the timing schedule for the EA True Up in July 2011. Previously, Microsoft required the True Up order to be received between 60 prior to, or 15 days after, the Anniversary Date. This is now amended to 60-30 days prior to the next Anniversary. Microsoft request payment to be received within 30 days and the Invoice date can be set to align to the Anniversary. On the 3rd Anniversary, the order is submitted in the last 30 days with payment due within 3l0 days of receipt of invoice. Accordingly it is recommended to review SAM process and align to financial systems to support the new discovery, reporting and payment schedule(s ).

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3 thoughts on “How does the True Up Process work?

  1. Pingback: Top Microsoft Licensing Searches of 2013 | Microsoft License Review

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